How to Teach The Old Man and the Sea to 7th Graders

I teach two sets of 7th grade English to GATE students this year, so when I found a partial class set of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea in the back of the book room, I thought why not give it a go.  See what happens.   What follows is my advice for anyone considering using The Old Man and the Sea with … Continue reading How to Teach The Old Man and the Sea to 7th Graders

Bret Harte Defeats Ernest Hemingway – Tournament of Short Stories II

This week in a stunning, surprise upset victory Bret Harte’s “The Outcasts of Poker Flat” and “Miggles” defeated Ernest Hemingway’s “Three Shots” and “Indian Camp.” I call this an upset victory because I am a big, life-long fan of Ernest Hemingway.  Yes, I know.  Don’t bother going there, I know all about it.  And I’m still a big fan. I’ll go to my grave arguing that all American fiction, … Continue reading Bret Harte Defeats Ernest Hemingway – Tournament of Short Stories II

A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

This book is not really about Paris. I read somewhere that A Moveable Feast is selling quite well in the aftermath of the Paris Attacks, but I think that group of readers will be disappointed. A Moveable Feast could be set in any city with lots of cafes.  It really doesn’t have much to do with Paris at all. My partner C.J. spent his high school  years … Continue reading A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

A Short Story Omnibus Edition

I’ve reviewed short stories here and at my old blog for many years now.  Not quite on a weekly basis, not all the time anyway, but pretty close.  These are some of the reviews I ran at Ready When You Are, C.B. in the years 2009 to 2011.  I’m slowly migrating all of my old posts over to this new site.  I just can’t bare … Continue reading A Short Story Omnibus Edition

Strangers on a Train: Ernest Hemingway vs. Charles de Lint

This one should have been more of a challenge. For the Deal Me In Short Story Challenge I’ve been selecting two stories each round by drawing two cards from my deck and reading the stories assigned to each card.  Afterwards, I try to link the two somehow in my review.  It’s been fun. Sometimes it’s been impossible, but this time it was a cinch. I selected … Continue reading Strangers on a Train: Ernest Hemingway vs. Charles de Lint